• (+44) 020 7435 22 49
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

IELTS Speaking Part 3

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active
 

In today’s post, we finalise our series of tips for the IELTS Speaking Part. We have provided you with tips and examples on how to perform well in this section of the test.

IELTS Speaking Part 3 lasts for about 4 to 5 minutes and it is an opportunity for candidates to show the length of your answers. The questions will be linked to the topic you had to describe in part 2, the long turn. One of the biggest concerns about this part is how to give an answer that is long enough.

We will give you some strategies to practice this part as well as some useful sentences to introduce you answers in some questions.

1. Did you understand the question?
I keep insisting on this aspect a lot as it is essential that you understand the question in order to provide a good answer. The questions are normally designed for a general understanding and should not be very difficult to get them but, if for any reasons you are not sure, ask for clarification. The only way to give the best answer is to know the question. The examiner will not repeat the question if you don’t ask.

job interview session

2. Do I have time to think about my answer?
As it happens with Part 1, you don’t have any preparation time and you need to give an answer more or less straight away. I say more or less as you can use some useful phrases to gain some time, especially if it is a complicated question. Some phrases you can use:

- That’s an interesting question; let me think about it…
- I have never thought about this before but I suppose…
- I don’t really know for sure but I would say…

However, do not use these phrases to introduce every answer but only when a question is unexpected and you really need some time to think.

3. Let me give you an example
Giving an example to explain your answer is a great way to show your knowledge of certain grammar structures and vocabulary. It is certainly easier to explain your point of view with a ‘real story’ example than attempting to look for a reason to your answer. To introduce examples, here are some expressions you can use:

- For example, just look at…
- Take Z as an example…
- Z is a clear example of…
- Z is a case in point…

4. What about my mistakes?
In a speaking test is frequent to make mistakes as we pay more attention to the fluency than the accuracy. However, if you make a mistake and you realize about it, correct it immediately. This will show the examiner that you have a good control over your language.

5. The longer, the better
This is usually the most worrying point. Let’s say that this part of the speaking is to ‘show off’ your abilities so the longer answers you give the better the examiner will be able to judge this. The type of questions in part 3 are normally about advantages and disadvantages, comparing issues from the past to the present, and also giving an opinion about current topics like health, environment or technology.

A question that my students frequently ask me is ‘how long should my answer be?’ Although there is not a set amount of time or words to each answer, I would recommend using at least 3 or 4 sentences. Here are some introductory phrases you can use to start your answer:

- It’s not a topic that I have lots to say but I guess…
- There are many reasons but I would say the main one is that…
- I tend to think that…
- From my point of view what I see is that…
- I am of the opinion that…

I hope these techniques can help you a bit more to prepare for this part and to improve your speaking skills. Remember the best way to do this is by putting it into practice.

 

Have you got more suggestions or tips to share with us? Leave a comment and tell us about your experience!